Monthly Archives: November 2013

Cycling Shoes and Bunions

Clipless cycling shoes are notoriously tight. This is great for fit, and not so great if you have a wide forefoot or bunions. If you are a cyclist and suffer from bunions or have a wide forefoot, the following shoe-fitting recommendations should help.

Cycling_Bunion

  1. If possible, try and find shoes that don’t have a strap that tightens over the bump as seen above. Ideally, you will want to wear shoes that have either 3 straps or an offset strap away from the bump as this image shows.

Cycling_3_Straps

  1. If you already have a shoe that secures and tightens directly over the bump, simply undo the strap and avoid using it entirely as the following image shows.

Cycling_Bunions_Unsecured_Strap

Advertisements

Non-Slip Work Shoes for Narrow Feet

If you need a non-slip shoe for restaurant or housekeeping work and you have a narrow foot, your choices are very limited. Fortunately, Skechers makes a non-slip lace shoe for men that — even though sized medium — runs narrow. The style is called Rockland-Systemic and can be purchased from Zappos.com.

First and foremost, this shoe is great because it laces (as opposed to being a slip-on style), which is always better for the narrow foot. Also terrific is the fact that there are 6 sets of eyelets: the more eyelets there are, the better the shoe fit, especially for a narrow foot.

Skechers_Rockland_Work

Finally, there is no hourglass in the waist of the shoe, which provides support in the arch where needed most. This also makes for a stable foundation if orthotics are to be worn inside the shoe.

Skechers_Rockland_Waist

Hiking Boots & Bunions

Hiking boots are designed to resist side-to-side motion. This is typically accomplished by using a stiff upper and reinforcing the shoe both laterally and medially. Although this is great for support, it can make the shoe feel like a vice grip for those hikers having bunions or needing extra forefoot width. If you have bunions, then you will want to make sure your shoe doesn’t have additional trim over the bony prominence.

Hiker with Tailor's Bunion with hiking boot trim removed over painful area.

Hiker with Tailor’s Bunion with hiking boot trim removed over painful area.

If it does, then removing the trim can mean the difference between comfort and pain. The following image is a hiker having a Tailor’s bunion. As the image above shows, it was easy to remove the trim, making the boot more forgiving in those otherwise tight areas.

You can also modify the lacing as the last tutorial in the following video shows.