Category Archives: Wide Feet

A Cycling Shoe for Wide Feet

Cycling shoes are notoriously narrow, which is why cyclist with wide feet can have such a hard time finding cycling shoes that fit. TC came in today wearing a new pair of fi’zi:k cycling shoes whose fit he wanted me to approve, to which I immediately did. His model, R5B Uomo Boa, was a perfect fit for his wide feet.

Wide-Cycling-Shoe-1

Surprisingly, I had never heard of the fi’zi:k brand before, but their description impressed me as much as their shoes did. I found the following information on their website:

Fizik
Fizik: Born in 1996 as a brand made for high performance fi’zi:k was designed in the USA, and handmade in Italy by the world’s largest saddle manufacturer, Selle Royal. Fi’zi:k is the phonetic spelling of the word physique, referring to the form or state of the human body.
Fizik_Cycling_Shoe_2

If you have wide feet and are at a loss for a well-designed, well-made cycling shoe, check out fi’zi:k. Several specialty cycling stores carry this brand as does Amazon.com.Fizik R5B Uomo Boa, Black/Dark Grey Although this model is sized medium, it runs wide.

With an MSRP of approximately $150, this is definitely one shoe you will want to try on if you have wide feet.

Stay tuned for my next cycling post where I’ll be discussing the top 5 most common cycling foot injuries I treat. In the meantime here’s a link to some of my previous cycling posts:

Cycling Shoes And Sesamoid Pain

Spin Class and Forefoot (Sesamoid) Pain

Cycling Shoes and Bunions

Cycling Shoe Brand Review – DZR

Life happens. Don’t wait.

Hiking Boots & Bunions

Hiking boots are designed to resist side-to-side motion. This is typically accomplished by using a stiff upper and reinforcing the shoe both laterally and medially. Although this is great for support, it can make the shoe feel like a vice grip for those hikers having bunions or needing extra forefoot width. If you have bunions, then you will want to make sure your shoe doesn’t have additional trim over the bony prominence.

Hiker with Tailor's Bunion with hiking boot trim removed over painful area.

Hiker with Tailor’s Bunion with hiking boot trim removed over painful area.

If it does, then removing the trim can mean the difference between comfort and pain. The following image is a hiker having a Tailor’s bunion. As the image above shows, it was easy to remove the trim, making the boot more forgiving in those otherwise tight areas.

You can also modify the lacing as the last tutorial in the following video shows.

When Zero Drop Doesn’t Work

Zero drop minimalist shoes are all the rage right now. Unfortunately, just because a shoe has zero height differential — between the ball of the foot and heel — doesn’t mean it will work for you.

Case in point: One patient I saw today is an ultrarunner who switched from a structured shoe to a zero drop minimalist style two years ago to reduce unilateral infrapatellar pain. Fortunately, the pain resolved, but within the last several months he started to experience increasingly painful peroneal (outer foot) pain and medial (inner) meniscal knee pain. He did not have either pain prior to training in the zero drop shoes.

A quick evaluation of his zero drop shoes, identified an hourglass-shaped midsole/outsole.

Minimalist_Medial

The arrow shows the narrow midsole width and the rectangle shows how much of his midfoot was only being supported by the upper (25%). This significant lack of support mid-arch caused his arch to negatively drop below the plane of the heel and forefoot, altering his knee and foot mechanics enough to produce compensatory pain in other areas.

The following image shows the top view of his foot in the shoe. As you can see the grey midsole disappears from the entire arch — and this is where support is needed the most.

Minimalist_Hourglass_Medial

If you’re running in minimalist or zero drop shoes, you will still want to match the shoe to your foot type — otherwise new injuries can occur.

Tennis and Bunions — Nike Zoom Vapor 9

Finding a tennis/court shoe to accommodate a wide foot with a bunion, is no easy task. Fortunately, Nike Zoom Vapor 9, is just that shoe. Although sized for the male foot, it will work for women, size 7 and beyond.  If you are a woman with a size 7 foot, order size 6 men’s which is the equivalent size. Now, on to the features that make this such an outstanding shoe.

  • Mesh near the bump — Most tennis-specific shoes have an entirely leather upper with reinforced trim and/or stitching over the bunion area. Zoom Vapor 9 has mesh, which allows for a wide forefoot and expansion over the bunion area.

Vapor_Tennis_Medial

  • Not only does this feature help to decrease pressure along the bunion, it also helps for those players having hammertoes. Beyond that, mesh makes this shoe lightweight and more responsive for being on your toes.

Vapor_Tennis_Dorsal2

  • Wide waist — Tennis players with a wide forefoot, arch collapse and excessive pronation need support, especially mid-arch. Zoom Vapor 9 doesn’t hourglass in at the waist — and that provides stability and maximum support.

Vapor_Tennis_Plantar

  • Torsional stability — Tennis is a sport with lots of side-to-side motion, primarily on the forefoot. Because of this, the shoe needs to be stable lengthwise, which Zoom Vapor 9 is.

All in all, this is a terrific shoe. If you have a wide foot — with or without a bunion and/or hammertoes — then you will want to check this model out.

Shoe Review – Capezio Canvas Dance Sneaker

I recently helped a modern dancer who was experiencing bunion pain whenever she danced barefoot — which was all the time. Although her bunions were significantly enlarged, she was pain free as long as she wore shoes.

The solution was to find her an appropriate shoe to dance in — finding dance shoes which can accommodate a wide foot with a bunion can be challenging, but Capezio’s Canvas Dance Sneaker does just that.

The upper is canvas, which — in addition to being lightweight and breathable — expands in the area of the bunion allowing for better fit. Lacing to the forefoot also allows for adjustments, an important feature for the wide forefoot.

This shoe also provides structure, which helps with alignment and promotes better function and less pain at the bunion site. Lastly, the thick, cushioned, forefoot and heel provide excellent shock absorption for not only the feet but the lower extremities in general.

Shoe Review – Asics Gel Foundation 10 Field Review

I recently compared Asics Gel Foundation 10 to version 9.

As the following field review of Asics Gel Foundation 10 highlights, this is one of my favorite shoes this season. It’s lightweight, yet structured and although it is no longer offered in narrow — medium and wide widths still provide a great fit.

Shoe Review – Asics GT-2170

I previously reviewed Asics GT-2170 and compared it to Asics GT-2160. The following video is a field review of Asics GT-2170, which has changed significantly from Asics GT-2160. Although GT-2170 fits the same volume-wise as GT-2160, structure-wise, it no longer supports the excessively pronated foot.